4,837 notes | Reblog


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
4,729 notes | Reblog
 



fuckyeahmarxismleninism:


Murder as spectator sport

Israelis bring chairs to hilltop in Sderot overlooking Gaza. Clapping when blasts are heard. (photo tweeted by @allansorensen72)

Via Ben White


Apartheid. Racism. Fascism. Zionism. Colonialism. Imperialism. 
From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.





disgusting.

 

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Murder as spectator sport
Israelis bring chairs to hilltop in Sderot overlooking Gaza. Clapping when blasts are heard. (photo tweeted by @allansorensen72)
Via Ben White

Apartheid. Racism. Fascism. Zionism. Colonialism. Imperialism. 

From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.

disgusting.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
22,775 notes | Reblog


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The art here is dope! Wish I knew the name of this artist ATM. #art #panel #harlem #brownstone #HigherSelfArts #HigherSelfLife

The art here is dope! Wish I knew the name of this artist ATM. #art #panel #harlem #brownstone #HigherSelfArts #HigherSelfLife

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
84,271 notes | Reblog


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
67,052 notes | Reblog


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
524 notes | Reblog

Kali in union with Bhairava over Shiva

Kali in union with Bhairava over Shiva

(Source: arjuna-vallabha)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
4,726 notes | Reblog
If Tolkien Were Black by Laura Miller
(N.K. Jemisin (left) and David Anthony Durham)
Looking at the most visible exemplars of epic fantasy — from J.R.R. Tolkien to such bestselling authors as George R.R. Martin and Robert Jordan — a casual observer might assume that big, continent-spanning sagas with magic in them are always set in some imaginary variation on Medieval Britain. There may be swords and talismans of power and wizards and the occasional dragon, but there often aren’t any black- or brown-skinned people, and those who do appear are decidedly peripheral; in “The Lord of the Rings,” they all seem to work for the bad guys.
Our hypothetical casual observer might therefore also conclude that epic fantasy — one of today’s most popular genres — would hold little interest for African-American readers and even less for African-American writers. But that observer would be dead wrong. One of the most celebrated new voices in epic fantasy is N.K. Jemisin, whose debut novel, “The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms,” won the Locus Award for best first novel and nominations for seemingly every other speculative fiction prize under the sun. Another is David Anthony Durham, whose Acacia Trilogy has landed on countless best-of lists. Both authors recently published the concluding books in their trilogies.
Although they came to the genre from different paths, both Jemisin and Durham have used it to wrench historical and cultural themes out of their familiar settings and hold them up in a different light. “I never felt that fantasy needed to be an escape from reality,” Durham told me. “I wanted it to be a different sort of engagement with reality, and one that benefits from having magic and mayhem in it as well.”

In Durham’s trilogy, four royal siblings are deposed and then fight their way back to the throne in an empire presided over by the island city of Acacia. Their dynasty’s power resides in a Faustian bargain made with a league of maritime merchants: the League supplies a rabble-soothing drug in exchange for a quota of the empire’s children, who are sent off across the sea to meet an unknown fate. As promised, “Acacia” is a sweeping yarn filled with adventure, intrigue, sorcery and battles.

Jemisin’s series, too, is set in the capital of an empire that has been run by an aristocratic clan for generations. The power of the Arameri family, however, resides in the gods — specifically a pantheon of deities whom they have imprisoned and enslaved. The narrator of “The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms” is the daughter of a renegade member of the clan who ran off with a foreigner. Raised in a remote kingdom with its own fiercely independent customs, she returns to the capital seeking information about her mother and, once there, becomes embroiled in vicious palace intrigues.

She made the main character a woman and, in an even more marked departure from the norm, she decided to have that character narrate the book in the first person. “I knew that what I was writing was inherently defiant of the tropes of epic fantasy,” Jemisin said, “and I wasn’t sure it would be accepted.”

When Durham decided to write an epic fantasy, he set out to recapture the enchantment he felt as a 12-year-old, discovering Tolkien at his father’s house in Trinidad, while “brushfires and buzzards” ranged over the neighboring hills. Jemisin, on the other hand, based her trilogy on “the old-school epics: not Tolkien, but Gilgamesh.” The gods in her imaginary world evoke the squabbling divine families of the world’s great myths: “The ancient tales of mortals putting up with gods and trying to outsmart gods, of trickster gods outsmarting other gods: That’s the basis of my work.”
“The genre can go many, many more places than it has gone,” said Jemisin. “Fantasy’s job is kind of to look back, just as science fiction’s job is to look forward. But fantasy doesn’t always just have to look back to one spot, or to one time. There’s so much rich, fascinating, interesting, really cool history that we haven’t touched in the genre: countries whose mythology is elaborate and fascinating, cultures whose stories we just haven’t even tried to retell.”

If Tolkien Were Black by Laura Miller

(N.K. Jemisin (left) and David Anthony Durham)

Looking at the most visible exemplars of epic fantasy — from J.R.R. Tolkien to such bestselling authors as George R.R. Martin and Robert Jordan — a casual observer might assume that big, continent-spanning sagas with magic in them are always set in some imaginary variation on Medieval Britain. There may be swords and talismans of power and wizards and the occasional dragon, but there often aren’t any black- or brown-skinned people, and those who do appear are decidedly peripheral; in “The Lord of the Rings,” they all seem to work for the bad guys.

Our hypothetical casual observer might therefore also conclude that epic fantasy — one of today’s most popular genres — would hold little interest for African-American readers and even less for African-American writers. But that observer would be dead wrong. One of the most celebrated new voices in epic fantasy is N.K. Jemisin, whose debut novel, “The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms,” won the Locus Award for best first novel and nominations for seemingly every other speculative fiction prize under the sun. Another is David Anthony Durham, whose Acacia Trilogy has landed on countless best-of lists. Both authors recently published the concluding books in their trilogies.

Although they came to the genre from different paths, both Jemisin and Durham have used it to wrench historical and cultural themes out of their familiar settings and hold them up in a different light. “I never felt that fantasy needed to be an escape from reality,” Durham told me. “I wanted it to be a different sort of engagement with reality, and one that benefits from having magic and mayhem in it as well.”

image

In Durham’s trilogy, four royal siblings are deposed and then fight their way back to the throne in an empire presided over by the island city of Acacia. Their dynasty’s power resides in a Faustian bargain made with a league of maritime merchants: the League supplies a rabble-soothing drug in exchange for a quota of the empire’s children, who are sent off across the sea to meet an unknown fate. As promised, “Acacia” is a sweeping yarn filled with adventure, intrigue, sorcery and battles.

image

Jemisin’s series, too, is set in the capital of an empire that has been run by an aristocratic clan for generations. The power of the Arameri family, however, resides in the gods — specifically a pantheon of deities whom they have imprisoned and enslaved. The narrator of “The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms” is the daughter of a renegade member of the clan who ran off with a foreigner. Raised in a remote kingdom with its own fiercely independent customs, she returns to the capital seeking information about her mother and, once there, becomes embroiled in vicious palace intrigues.

image

She made the main character a woman and, in an even more marked departure from the norm, she decided to have that character narrate the book in the first person. “I knew that what I was writing was inherently defiant of the tropes of epic fantasy,” Jemisin said, “and I wasn’t sure it would be accepted.”

image

When Durham decided to write an epic fantasy, he set out to recapture the enchantment he felt as a 12-year-old, discovering Tolkien at his father’s house in Trinidad, while “brushfires and buzzards” ranged over the neighboring hills. Jemisin, on the other hand, based her trilogy on “the old-school epics: not Tolkien, but Gilgamesh.” The gods in her imaginary world evoke the squabbling divine families of the world’s great myths: “The ancient tales of mortals putting up with gods and trying to outsmart gods, of trickster gods outsmarting other gods: That’s the basis of my work.”

“The genre can go many, many more places than it has gone,” said Jemisin. “Fantasy’s job is kind of to look back, just as science fiction’s job is to look forward. But fantasy doesn’t always just have to look back to one spot, or to one time. There’s so much rich, fascinating, interesting, really cool history that we haven’t touched in the genre: countries whose mythology is elaborate and fascinating, cultures whose stories we just haven’t even tried to retell.”

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
170 notes | Reblog
Afrofuturism as a New Consciousness

In the beginning there was a story, a telling of what it meant to be a Black body in the White Western European imagination. A simple account constructed to explain extant narratives, told to maintain a lucrative status quo. Then there was awareness of counter-narratives challenging the status quo, undermining the easy acceptance of received ideas.

Afrofuturism has emerged as part of an urbanized culture, set against systematic and structural estrangement and disenfranchisement of global Blackness. It is not a movement in the traditional sense. Instead, Afrofuturism is a culture and aesthetic understanding addressing all manifest forms as it seeks ways to tell the Black story of rebellion and engages divergent forms of communication. Music, art, spoken word, dance, literature, and religion are some major forms of expression. Afrofuturism is a post-modern deconstruction of a Western European meta-narrative. 

Imagine a Black person in living memory, and long before that, having to look at their life as lived, their past and present. It is an easy realization that it has not been a good past and present (on most parts of the planet), and it is in the future that a viable and desired existence has a possibility. Or perhaps only in a parallel universe, or even better still, on another planet altogether, in a land far, far away, that the possibility of the Good Life exists.

Science and science fiction (in many forms beyond the written text) have emerged as a solution to the impossibilities that reality proposes. As a consequence, writers who deal with Afrocentric questions, such as Octavia Butler, Samuel Delaney, Greg Tate, and Nalo Hopkinson in writing, and Sun Ra and George Clinton, and Parliament Funk in music, have been seen as proponents of Afrofuturism. There is always an awareness of what it means to place the Black Body in the future, in Space. Gil Scott-Heron’s Whitey on the Moon attests to this.

Imagining a future, and being able to act on that impulse, has often been treated as a marker of freedom, especially personal freedom. The human spirit, individual and collective, has been rather resilient in maintaining growth, a conceptualization that allowed for a flourishing self-identity capable of resisting psychical death. New cultural forms have emerged to counteract imposed narratives, Afrocentric future-origin myths capable of counteracting the erasure and denigration of the many histories that Blackness endures around the world. 

While easy to argue that loss of identity only happened in the United State through the transatlantic slave trade, the reality is that Africans on the Continent and in the diaspora have had to negotiate their history and identity through a mediated narrative, mediated and reinforced by global colonial relationships, and Afrofuturism has become a viable methodology. Afrofuturism allows everything to be thought through again. Nothing is left untouched. The future allows for ease of interrogation of even the most unspoken taboos of lived life. Afrofuturism therefore allows for a new look at Blackness itself, a re-imagining of the self in relation to the other, the ability to tell one’s own story.

—Raimi Gbadamosi


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
342 notes | Reblog
Beware:
Ignorance
Protects itself.
Ignorance
Promotes suspicion.
Suspicion
Engenders fear.
Fear quails,
Irrational and blind,
Or fear looms,
Defiant and closed.
Blind, closed,
Suspicious, afraid,
Ignorance
Protects itself,
And protected,
Ignorance grows.
― Octavia E. Butler, Parable of the Talents 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1,618 notes | Reblog
In order to rise
From its own ashes
A phoenix
First
Must
Burn.
Octavia Butler, Parable of the Talents (via
postmodernismruinedme)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1,137 notes | Reblog
The world is full of painful stories. Sometimes it seems as though there aren’t any other kind and yet I found myself thinking how beautiful that gleam of water was through the trees. Parable of the Sower, Octavia E. Butler
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
716 notes | Reblog
Early Octavia Butler stories coming out in June
(ASSOCIATED PRESS) A pair of recently discovered early stories by prize-winning science fiction author Octavia Butler will be coming out as an e-book in June.
Open Road Integrated Media, a digital publisher, announced Tuesday that “A Necessary Being” and “Childfinder” will be compiled in a single volume titled “Unexpected Stories” and will be released June 24. Walter Mosley, the best-selling crime writer, has contributed an introduction.
“’Unexpected Stories’ reveals the themes that would become Butler’s lexicon: the complicating mysteries we assign to power, race, and gender,” Mosley writes. “Reading these tales is like looking at a photograph of a child who you only knew as an adult. In her eyes you can see the woman that you came to know much later; a face, not yet fully formed, that contains the promise of something that is now a part of you; the welcomed surprise of recognition in innocent eyes.”
Butler, who died in 2006 at age 58, was one of the first black science fiction writers to receive mainstream attention and was known for such books as “Bloodchild and Other Stories” and the novel “Parable of the Sower.” She was inducted, posthumously, into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2010.
Butler’s literary agent, Merrilee Heifetz, found the stories, written in the early 1970s, among the author’s papers at the Huntington Library in San Marino, Calif. According to Open Road, “A Necessary Being” tells of how the leaders of two ancient tribes “must broker a delicate peace to ensure that their peoples are to survive.” In “Childfinder,” a young woman “locates children with budding psionic powers and teaches them to protect themselves from society.”

Early Octavia Butler stories coming out in June

(ASSOCIATED PRESS) A pair of recently discovered early stories by prize-winning science fiction author Octavia Butler will be coming out as an e-book in June.

Open Road Integrated Media, a digital publisher, announced Tuesday that “A Necessary Being” and “Childfinder” will be compiled in a single volume titled “Unexpected Stories” and will be released June 24. Walter Mosley, the best-selling crime writer, has contributed an introduction.

“’Unexpected Stories’ reveals the themes that would become Butler’s lexicon: the complicating mysteries we assign to power, race, and gender,” Mosley writes. “Reading these tales is like looking at a photograph of a child who you only knew as an adult. In her eyes you can see the woman that you came to know much later; a face, not yet fully formed, that contains the promise of something that is now a part of you; the welcomed surprise of recognition in innocent eyes.”

Butler, who died in 2006 at age 58, was one of the first black science fiction writers to receive mainstream attention and was known for such books as “Bloodchild and Other Stories” and the novel “Parable of the Sower.” She was inducted, posthumously, into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2010.

Butler’s literary agent, Merrilee Heifetz, found the stories, written in the early 1970s, among the author’s papers at the Huntington Library in San Marino, Calif. According to Open Road, “A Necessary Being” tells of how the leaders of two ancient tribes “must broker a delicate peace to ensure that their peoples are to survive.” In “Childfinder,” a young woman “locates children with budding psionic powers and teaches them to protect themselves from society.”

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------